News Release | Environment New Mexico

Environment New Mexico Moving Ahead to Get Local Governments to Go Big on Solar

On the heels of the Albuquerque City Council adopting a bold goal to make the City a leader in solar energy, Environment New Mexico announced a push to get cities and local governments across the state and country to make sizable commitments to capturing the power of the sun.  The “Shining Cities” campaign will engage and mobilize thousands of members, volunteers and the growing ranks of stakeholders who recognize the tremendous environmental and economic benefits to convince local governments to expand their use of pollution-free solar power.

News Release | Environment New Mexico

Albuquerque City Council Unanimously Embraces Solar Future

The Albuquerque City Council voted unanimously to set a goal of utilizing solar energy to power 25 percent of electricity used by city facilities by 2025. This will set Albuquerque and New Mexico on a path to becoming a national leader on solar energy.

News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

New Mexico Falling Behind other Leading Solar States

New Mexico is falling behind a majority of states in an annual ranking of solar power capacity, despite having the technical potential to produce 1,000 times as much electricity from solar power as the state consumes each year. 

In this year’s ranking, New Mexico dropped to 13th in total solar capacity and 8th in total solar capacity per capita, after ranking 11th and 6th, respectively, last year.

News Release | Environment New Mexico

Map: Every New Mexican lives in a county affected by extreme weather disasters

Every citizen in New Mexico lives in a county affected recently by weather-related disasters, including wildfires, according to an interactive, online map released today that crunches data from the federal government. Scientists say global warming is already exacerbating some extreme weather events and their impacts.

News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Report quantifies harm to water, land and climate from decade of dirty drilling

n a single year, fracking wells across the country released at least 5.3 billion pounds of the potent greenhouse gas methane, as much global warming pollution as 22 coal-fired power plants.

The statistic is one of many in a new study by Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center that quantifies the environmental harm caused by more 137,000 fracking wells permitted since 2005.

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