Result

No toxic mining near the Grand Canyon

One million acres of land on the Grand Canyon’s borders are off-limits to new uranium mining claims for 20 years – the maximum allowed by law – thanks in part to Environment New Mexico and our members. Together with our national federation, we helped deliver more than 300,000 public comments, lobbied on Capitol Hill and released research that helped convince Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to protect the Grand Canyon from new toxic mining claims.

Result

We're defending Otero Mesa

When we discovered in 2011 that 180 hardrock mining claims threaten Otero Mesa’s wild grasslands, we sounded the alarm and mobilized 7,500 New Mexicans to urge President Obama to save Otero Mesa by designating it as a national monument. Together, we can convince the president to protect this rare Chihuhuan desert landscape, its 1,000 native species and the untapped freshwater aquifer it holds.

Result

Less toxic mercury in our water, air and bodies

In conjunction with our national federation, we helped persuade the Environmental Protection Agency to require that coal-fired powerplants like Cochise, near Farmington, cut the amount of toxic mercury they emit by 90% -- a big victory given mercury’s toxic effects on pregnant women and small children. We helped deliver a record-breaking 800,000 public comments –- and counting –- in support of the new rule.

Result

20% more efficient by 2020

New buildings would have been 20% more energy efficient by 2020 under building codes adopted by the Construction Industries Commission in 2010, thanks in part to Environment New Mexico and our supporters. Unfortunately, Martinez administration officials reverted to less efficient codes in 2012 –- but we’ll keep fighting to get our strong energy codes back in place. We’ve done it once!

Result

We fought back against subsidized sprawl

In the 2008 legislative session, Environment New Mexico and our allies were able to stop the Legislature from approving a tax bill that would have sent 75% of increased tax revenue from new developments directly into the pockets of mega-developers like Verde Group and SunCal –- effectively subsidizing their efforts to turn tens of thousands of acres of land into sprawling developments and subdivisions.

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